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Security Glossary

Security updates / patches

Software updates specifically designed to correct security loopholes in a given software application or operating system.

AntiSpam

Software you install on your PC to prevent unsolicited email (also known as SPAM) from reaching your inbox.

AntiSpyware

Software you install on your PC to protect it against spyware software. 'Spyware' is a general term for software that carries out certain actions such as promoting advertising, retrieving personal details or changing your PC setup, most often without your consent. It covers up the source of the message and allows its authors to gather data on your preferences, usually for illegal advertising purposes.

Antivirus

Software you install on your PC that acts as a sort of vaccine. It protects your computer against malicious software such as viruses, trojans and malware.  These malicious computer programmes are able to compromise the security of your PC, and can even capture and relay personal information to others.

Trojans

Malicious software that pretends to be of some use to you. It can compromise your PC's security by carrying out unexpected and unauthorised actions. Even though it does compromise system security, it doesn't propagate, like a virus does..

Authorisation Codes

Codes obtained via Token or text message, which enable users to confirm and carry out transactions from all their accounts via  millenniumbcp.pt.

Social engineering

Techniques used to gather important or confidential information by tricking people and exploiting their trust. Messages are sent out supposedly on behalf of companies or organisations addressees may have some relation to. Most of these messages contain warnings that try to scare receivers into replying.

Firewall

Software you install on your PC to reduce the risk of unwanted network intrusion, namely of external intrusions (hackers and viruses). Certain operating systems, such as Windows XP and Windows Vista come with a built-in firewall.

Hackers

Someone who tries to gain illegal access to computer systems to steal data.

Malware

Word combination of 'malicious' and 'software'. Software that aims to illicitly hack into a computer system to damage or steal data from it.

Pharming

When hackers redirect internet traffic from a website to an apparently identical website in an attempt to trick users into entering their personal details on the fake website.  Similar to phishing, pharming is even more insidious since it redirects users to fake websites, without their being aware of it or even having taken any action to that effect.

Phishing

An attempt to steal personal data. This normally consists of email messages that direct users to fake websites (very good copies of websites users visit with some regularity), where users are asked to enter confidential information.

SAFe

SAFe - Strong Authentication System - has the primary objective of providing a solution for Online Banking Clients that guarantees, regardless of the security level set on their own computers (antivirus, firewall, antispyware, etc.), completely secure financial transactions over this channel.

Spam

Mass sending of unsolicited email, which may have the goal of spreading viruses aimed at collecting contact lists or files.

Spyware

General term for software that carries out certain actions, such as advertising, retrieving personal details or changing your PC setup, most often without your consent.  It covers up the source of the message and allows its authors to gather data on your preferences, usually for illegal advertising purposes.

Virus

A computer programme created with the intention of infecting a computer and then replicating itself. As such, it can propagate very quickly and is, more often than not, very difficult to eliminate. Viruses can propagate through files sent between users (e.g. email attachments) and may contain instructions to become active under certain conditions (a specific date or certain user actions).

Worms

Malicious programme that can automatically propagate throughout computer networks, sending copies of itself to each computer on the network. It is different from a virus in the sense that a worm does not need to be executed to be active. Its swift propagation is due to vulnerabilities in the configuration of installed software on computers. As a general rule, worms grant unauthorised access and can freeze networks and IT systems.

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